Posted in 1.1 Creating, 1.2 Using, AECT Standard 1 (Content Knowledge)

Presentation Guideline using CARP

For this weeks EDTECH 506 assignment, we are tasked with creating an instructional graphic using CARP (Contrast, Alignment, Repetition, and Proximity). Personally, I feel that CARP is a key guideline when doing anything in graphic design. That said, I also feel like much of these concepts can happen unconsciously.

The graphic I choose to create for my Google Slides unit is an infographic on basic guidelines and suggestions for creating a slideshow. The intended use is to be printed in poster format and hung in the classroom.

rainville-carp

CARP Justification

Contrast: Contrast is being used with colors in the heading swoosh as well as typefaces. The contrast in this piece is there but minimal. Probably my least favorite part of the image is the lack of contrast in background colors vs foreground colors.. but at the same time this lack of contrast is intentional in an effort to create consistency without drawing attention to any one specific thing.

Alignment: The two main sections of this image show slightly different alignment schemes. All text and images are aligned consistently throughout and negative space is effectively used to lead the eye to the areas I’ve intended.

Repetition: The two main sections of the image show sub-sections with the same format repeated across the image. The slideshow tips use a snapshot format and the presenter tips use a simple center aligned list. Throughout the piece, the images are presented on top of a lighter circle background. This ties all the imagery together. Font typefaces and weights are also consistent to show headings and content text.

Proximity: You can very clearly identify, at a glance, that there are two main sections of the image. You can tell this by the proximity of the sub-sections and how they are laid out in a similar fashion.

What I would do differently

When updating this image for final use, I would try to re-work the ‘snapshot’ section. I feel like there is too much negative spacing here and overall makes the piece feel a little weak in the middle.

Posted in 1.1 Creating, 1.2 Using, 2.1 Creating, AECT Standard 1 (Content Knowledge), AECT Standard 2 (Content Pedagogy), Uncategorized

Design Process Model

This week we were tasked with using a design cycle to solve our graphic problems. Interesting enough I seem to be in a ‘design cycle’ cycle as I’ve just finished covering it in two of my classes that I teach and we’ve just done cycles in my other EDTECH class. Generally speaking a design cycle first figures out what a problem is, then brainstorms possible solutions, followed by putting those solutions into action and finally evaluating what worked or didn’t. Chapter 4 in our textbook uses a 3 step cycle called ACE; Analyze, Create, and Evaluate. The introduction image I chose to work on this week had many design challenges and I worked through this cycle a few times, completely switching directions at one point.

GS Intro.png

The image I created is an introduction image to the unit. My class (HS GenTech students) has an established procedure where we analyze any materials we have in the upcoming unit and we come up with the unit’s vocabulary words as a class. For this assignment, I created a graphic organizer for students to use during the process. They will use this handout during other vocab assignments (assuming they do not lose it) as their word bank.

For the design, I am using the same header as last week to keep consistency in my design and create flow throughout the unit. Since this is a worksheet that will get collected, graded, and returned, there is a section for student info in the upper right corner. I am also using a similar layout format with the rounded rectangles to chunk info. Based on class feedback, this time I’ve included numbers to indicate order. The trickiest part for me was laying out the two input sections. The final vocab table needed 10 cells for words which make it an awkward size and the brainstorm table needed a bit of instruction making that arrangement awkward. I’m mostly happy with how the pieces settled into place. While I would prefer the sections to be flipped do to order of use but I feel like the students will be ok with it since they are already familiar with the procedure. The awkward spacing of these sections provided a funny gap that I filled with a superfluous clipart image. While I don’t feel that the image is needed, the worksheet does seem to lack something without it. 

Posted in 1.1 Creating, 1.2 Using, 2.1 Creating, 3.1 Creating, AECT Standard 1 (Content Knowledge), AECT Standard 2 (Content Pedagogy), AECT Standard 3 (Learning Environments)

Using Shapes in Instruction

This week we are tasked with creating instructional materials focusing on the use of shapes. Here is my project:

shapes

The students using this “at a glance” guide are high school technology students. They have already learned about Google Drive, Docs, and Sheets and are familiar with the Google layout. This handout is meant to provide a quick snapshot of the concept of Themes and Masters. Many students have used Google Slides often but do not know about Master pages and the ones who do know, don’t seem to take advantage of the tool. I feel this handout (poster?) provides a quick reminder.

The use of shapes in this handout is throughout the document. The header uses simple shapes to define a heading and title area. These shapes provide for a clean look (Lohr, 2008, p. 250) and tie together with the overall theme of the unit. The arrows bring attention to the main point of each image. I chose the overall display shape based on how many points I wanted to make. (Lohr, 2008, p. 255) In this case, I kept it simple with 4 squares as I didn’t want it to get too busy and move away from an “at a glance” tool.

The person I had test my design gave feedback on the graphic aspect vs the instructional one. Based on this person’s feedback, I can see areas where the spacing could be tightened up, for example between the header and first squares as well as the very bottom of the page. It was also suggested to add a footer similar to the header, I agree that would be a nice touch.

Reference
Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance: Lessons in visual literacy(2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, N.J: Pearson/Merrill/Prentice Hall.

Posted in 1.1 Creating, 1.2 Using, 1.3 Assessing/Evaluating, 3.1 Creating, AECT Standard 1 (Content Knowledge), AECT Standard 3 (Learning Environments)

Typography

Oh how I do so love Typography. I would consider myself a bit of a type snob. I notice subtleties of type that most do not. Things like kerning, leading, and tracking are all big blaring overlooked settings IMO. In fact, if you’re into it like I am, check out this kerning game, I can spend hours kerning mindlessly.

For this assignment, we are tasked with creating typographic images to represent lessons/objectives of a unit of instruction. For my unit, I will be creating materials for lessons on Google Slides. I chose to go with a typogram theme and tried to create literal examples of the type.

rainville-week4-01

The first image is to represent “Presentation“. The main objective of this lesson is to review the big picture rules of creating a presentation. I chose to use the words to outline the shape and the Google Slides “GS” as the content. For the second image, the lesson is about adding and manipulating shapes to your presentation. Therefore the words “Using Shapes” are displayed using shapes. The third lesson focuses on formatting text and images. For this image, I’ve used words to express formatting text and I created a “picture” to indicated formatting an image. For the fourth lesson on collaboration, I have created the outline of a document using the word “collaborate” and added bits of input being added from various directions.

All of the images, since they will be used for the same unit, have commonalities to tie them together, most notably they use the same typeface (Lohr, 2008, p.215). The typeface itself,  Fingerling Tall would be considered a decorative typeface which makes it best for titles and headings. A paragraph with this typeface would be difficult to read (Lohr, 2008, p.224). I feel it works well here because it is boxy enough to create the shapes I needed as well as being readable enough to use for the art itself.

My very simple test consisted of showing the images to my two teenage daughters and my husband. Their opinions are likely biased but they all seemed to understand the overall message. Of course, the act of showing my stuff makes me see the flaws, there are some funky things happening in the last shape, the word collaboration is bent in weird spots.

Lohr, L.L. Creating graphics for learning and performance: Lessons in visual literacy. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J: Pearson, 2008.